The Common Denominator in Change Management Methods
Aug21

The Common Denominator in Change Management Methods

There are many Change Management methodologies out there, and most of them are just as effective as the others.  They may vary in scope, for example, some may cover more Change Management concepts.   They may also vary in complexity, where some require more knowledge of Change Management fundamentals.  In either case, most Change Management methods can be reduced to the same common denominator… engaging with stakeholders. In Change Management, a stakeholder is either someone who is impacted by the change or someone who can influence the change.  This distinction between impact and influence is important as it sets the foundation for the rules of engagement.  At its most basic level, traditionally stakeholders being impacted have minimal authority over the change, whereas stakeholders with influence have maximum control over the change.  For this reason, how you engage with them will vary; however, the key to success for both is engaging them in the first place! Below are some tips for engaging with stakeholders. Find out their wants and needs.  Take the time to really get to know your stakeholders, either individually or as a group, so that you can analyze their situations and perspectives in order to uncover their concerns and requirements. Personalize the interactions.  Tailor your messages based on your stakeholder analysis so that your interactions are personalized, meaningful and compelling. Follow through on commitments.  Build trust with your stakeholders by setting, managing and meeting their expectations. Be consistent and supportive.  Remain stable and dependable when stakeholders experience varying emotional responses to the change, as those reactions are natural and to be expected. To summarize, stakeholder engagement is not one-way, nor is it one-time – it’s an ongoing dialogue that builds relationships. What other common denominators do you feel are critical success factors for Change Management...

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What makes a Successful Enterprise Architect?
Aug20

What makes a Successful Enterprise Architect?

Successful enterprises prepare for opportunities and risks. They endure difficult economies, seize new opportunities, and grow their business. These organizations link productive initiatives to desired goals and results; that way they foster working conditions that will deliver true value to the organization. People enjoy the efforts when they know that there is a reasonable, thoughtful plan that the organization is following, and that their input is valued and recognized in achieving a level of success. To achieve this, the enterprise needs to recognize, support and advocate the use of an Enterprise Architecture as a competitive differentiator. Enterprise Architecture is about understanding the Enterprise; they need to have a strong understanding of the business, its strategic direction, its strengths, weaknesses… Writing more computer code just won’t get you there. Enterprise Architecture is the anchor for delivering consistent value throughout the Enterprise’s lifetime. But how does someone become a successful enterprise architect? What does it entail? Through practice and the use of different frameworks (Zachman, TOGAF, FEAF ….) we recognize a set of required components for success. You need: Architectural Models – To represent artifacts from the perspective of several business viewpoints. A Framework – To logically structure the subjects, relationships, and perspectives. A Methodology – To guide, simplify, and standardize processes. Solution Models – To understand and combine independent architectural elements to begin to build something. Beside these components, an Enterprise Architect needs to have a passion for EA, be able to quickly adapt activities to changes, needs to be able to motivate and inspire, negotiate to get things done, be able to think quickly on an abstract (helicopter view) and detailed level, have a great complex problem solving mind, be process oriented, have great people skills, be able to lead and to make quality decisions with a high level of stakeholder...

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