Dubai ‘smart city’: are we there yet?
Oct30

Dubai ‘smart city’: are we there yet?

A “smart city” vision is born as a response to the challenges that arise from the steadily growing number of people living in urban clusters. While an exact definition has yet to be formed, a smart city provides high quality of life to its citizens with the following six drivers acting as forces of innovation: 1. Smart mobility 2. Smart environment 3. Smart people 4. Smart living 5. Smart governance The main goal is to create a competitive and attractive business environment by leveraging on the human capital of the city, while allowing for wider participation in various aspects of public life. This includes developing novel ways to implement transportation systems and establishing an increased focus on natural resource preservation. An Information and Communications Technology (ICT) infrastructure is the basis of the smart city foundation because it provides advanced services in Intelligent Transport System (ITS), environmental and energy monitoring, building management, health care, public safety and security, and remote working and e-commerce domains. In other words, this type of infrastructure can play a key role in intertwining all the actors of a smart city to support the provision of ubiquitous services. According to United Nations estimates, the number of urban residents will rise to 5 billion by 2030 and 80 percent of the world population will live in urban areas by 2050. “City” has gradually replaced “Country” as the main unit on the perspective of global competitiveness due to the growing contribution of national Gross Domestic Product. In recent years, this urbanization trend has also affected developing countries. For instance, in China, urban population has grown to more thank 600 million, equaling 50 percent of the population living in urban areas. That is, urbanization has become an irresistible element globally when it comes to development of a country. The concept of a city taking the lead, in contrast to the countryside, Dubai has its position set to be a city of “now” and enjoys wealth of praise for its advanced ICT infrastructure. Dubai is the most liked urban city for the Middle East as well as all of Asia, in terms of where people move to pursue better quality of life and career opportunities. E-government has already been a great success for the Dubai government, and taking it in consideration, the government has embarked bigger initiative of e-services to transform Dubai into a “smart city.” How “smart” is Dubai already? Despite the success of Dubai’s government initiatives, a smart city initiative has its own challenges and obstacles. One has to critically analyze what status Dubai is considered now and what should it be anticipating when it comes to moving toward...

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Is your Innovation Blossoming?
Oct19

Is your Innovation Blossoming?

Seeing as innovation is an essential element for an organization to survive and succeed, most organizations spend a considerable amount of time, money and effort on making sure that they are innovative. Organizations would not go through all of this trouble without expecting a return, so there has to be a way to measure the outcomes of your innovation efforts to establish whether what you’re doing is working or if you should try something else. Luckily, measuring your success rate with innovation can be done in several different ways and can give you the full picture on how well your innovation efforts are impacting your business. Quantitative measurements: power in numbers Numbers are a straightforward and emphasized way to demonstrate the effect of innovation on a company.  Publicly listed companies are often heavily influenced by innovation; for proof, just look at the spike in Apple’s stock prices when a new innovation is announced.  There is a lot of speculation around stock prices which is why listed companies are so eager to be innovative or be perceived as innovative.  Other quantitative measures include return on investment and profits; however, there is a key performance indicator developed by the Balance Scorecard Institute that provides a measure for a successful innovation effect which isn’t so heavily based on the financial end game as it can be applied at any stage of the product life cycle. Called the Return on Product Development Expense (RoPDE™), this indicator measures the performance of product/service innovation and development by incorporating the common factors of innovation (increased number and quality of good ideas, increased efficiency in the implementation of good ideas and improved overall success from the implementation of good ideas). RoPDE™ is calculated by subtracting product development expense (PDE) from gross margin (GM) and dividing the total by product development expense (PDE): RoPDE™ = (GM-PDE)/PDE Quantitative indicators are able to give you the hard data on your innovation efforts, so I suggest that you choose the ones that measure the particular aspects of innovation that matter the most to you and include that in your analysis of whether your innovation efforts are paying off. Qualitative measurements: public opinion Of course, numbers can only tell a part of the story; qualitative measurements can give you the juicy information behind the data.  Qualitative research methods such as surveys and focus group discussions can give an in-depth picture of how your innovation efforts are paying off, but a cheaper and less complicated way to accomplish the same goal is through social media.  Thanks to the readiness of the public to give their opinion on something in an instant, there will...

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ABM Case Study Competition Round 1 Complete
Oct18

ABM Case Study Competition Round 1 Complete

The SEAS’ advisory board is happy to announce Round 1 winners in the Acme Building Materials (ABM) Case Study Competition.  Click here to access the Original Case Study post. Over the past several months we looked for the most active participants and those committed to work on the case study as thought leaders.  Today we are happy to announce the completion of Round 1 of our competition and the selection of the following individuals as “Lead Consultants“: Ahsan Rauf, Strategy & Enterprise Architecture Ajwad Adeel, Strategy & Performance Iyad Hindi, Enterprise Architecture Dima Khatib, Change Management Raheela Babar, Change Management Jayme Johnson, Change Management In addition, the following SEAS’ advisory board members will play roles in the Consulting Engagement simulation: Regine Deleu, Acme Building Material Board Member (To provide responses and guidance to the consulting team) Fadi Hindi, Engagement Partner (To guide the analysis, roadmap development, and offer guidance with strategy/frameworks) **Note: The SEAS’ case study is a Consulting Engagement Simulation without any commercials or financial/non-financial compensation to participants.  Individuals are participating in the case study as an academic exercise to further their knowledge and careers by subscribing to SEAS’ fundamental belief in knowledge sharing and career growth.  See our Mission & Values on the main home page for details.  ...

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