ABM Case Study Presented at ACMP MENA Conference
Feb13

ABM Case Study Presented at ACMP MENA Conference

The Association of Change Management Professionals (ACMP) MENA region hosted its forth annual conference in Dubai on February 4-6, 2014.  This year’s conference theme was “Manage Change: Achieve Success”.  It brought together Change Management experts and professionals to share experiences, network and learn from each other and from exports in the field. It was my privilege during the conference to present a paper on “Managing Organizational Change”.  The case study that we have been working through as the SEAS’ Consulting Team was showcased during my presentation.  During the session, participants also had the opportunity to complete an analysis of their own organization’s culture, which enriched the learning and created interesting discussions and debates that continued following the presentation. To download an excerpt of the presentation, click...

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ABM Case Study – Change Management Approach
Dec19

ABM Case Study – Change Management Approach

During the Situation Analysis phase of the ABM Health Check Engagement Simulation, the Change Management team focused on developing a good understanding of the human capital and change related concerns.  Out of the 51 clarified concerns related to the ABM case study, 23 concerns were People related including retention, high employee dissatisfaction, poor communications, unstructured performance management processes and almost non-existent employee development and succession planning practices.  The 23 concerns were classified by seriousness, urgency, and growth and the top concerns were identified and prioritized. Due to the high number of concerns and the limited resources that ABM would have to address all the concerns at once, the Change Management team decided to take a more holistic approach to the analysis and step back to build an overall current state picture of the organization before diving into making any  recommendations or developing the roadmap.  The method that the Change Management team will be using for this holistic approach is the “Competing Values Framework” developed by Kim S. Cameron and Robert E. Quinn.  This framework focuses on “Culture” and provides a very good tool to help organizations analyze their current culture type and define the desired culture that will work for them to turn around their organization and achieve success. According to the Competing Values Framework, there are four major culture types: Hierarchy, Market, Clan, and Adhocracy.  The more an organization’s dominant culture matches with its leadership styles, management roles, human capital practices, and quality management strategies the more effective and successful the organization is.  The other finding of Cameron’s and Quinn’s research is that organizations tend to go through cultural changes as they grow and mature.  To the extent that an organization can define its desired future culture, this change can be more methodical and organized as opposed to what ABM is currently experiencing. In order to develop a roadmap and a set of recommendations for ABM, the Change Management team will start with a cultural analysis using the “Organizational Cultural Assessment Instrument” developed as part of the Competing Values Framework.  This assessment will be completed by ABM’s board of directors and will define each board member’s perspective on the current culture and desired culture for ABM.  Taking into consideration the agreed upon desired culture, the Change Management team will then work through the top concerns and develop a roadmap that addresses these concerns in a way that allows ABM to reach their desired culture.  The output of the cultural assessment can also be used by members of the SEAS’ Consulting Team in the Strategy & Innovation stream and the Enterprise Architecture...

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Change Management: A Key Player in Your Starter Team
May23

Change Management: A Key Player in Your Starter Team

Throughout my work at different organizations in the change management field, I often wondered why change management is not brought in at the very early stages during strategy development!  In most cases, change management is not considered until the organization strategy is finalized, all the initiatives have been mapped out, the sponsors are identified, and the teams to implement each of the initiatives are already in place.  But is that really the right time to engage change management?  I would argue at that point, it may already be too late! In mature organizations, change management is not only considered when major changes are being introduced – it is more of a “lifestyle” for the senior executives and managers of that organization.  It is part of the core values and the competencies of every manager.  It is built into their everyday work and it is definitely built into their strategy development process. So why should you bring in change management in the early stages of strategy development as opposed to after?  Here’s some food for thought: To ensure full engagement by all stakeholders – When defining your strategy, you need the involvement of all levels of the organization.  If people are involved in the definition and setting the direction for the organization, they have a bigger stake in the game and are more committed.  What better way to engage your employees than to have them involved in the development of their own strategy.  You’ll find that employees are passionate about the organization and have lots of creative ideas that can be considered while developing your strategy and your value proposition.   This does not only apply to your employees but also to your customers, partners, and suppliers.  Ultimately, you’ll have a better targeted strategy and all your stakeholders are ready to execute. To ensure proper alignment of your sponsors – In most cases, sponsors of key strategies and initiatives are identified purely based on their function.  By doing some initial interviews and assessments for your full executive team, you can align the sponsors to the areas that they are most interested and enthusiastic about.  A passionate executive can do wonders to your strategy and to the engagement of his or her employees. To jump start the execution of your strategy – change management and resistance management plans can be developed as the strategy is being defined.  As soon as the strategy is finalized, all sponsorship and communication activities can be already in place and ready to go.  You won’t have a lag time until you involve the change team to figure out how to cascade down the strategy and how to...

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