Published: Acme Building Materials Case Study
Jun08

Published: Acme Building Materials Case Study

We are proud to announce that SEAS Inc. has published the Acme Building Materials Case Study to the Apple Book store on May 31, 2014. View the iTunes page here. The book is available for download to your iPad or Mac iBooks application free of charge.  The book has an introductory video and several interactive components that facilitate learning. SEAS launched the Case Study on May 15, 2013 by developing problem text for a fictitious company called Acme Building Materials, the original post can be found on this link.  SEAS selected a handful of members to provide thought leadership to solve the business problems facing ABM and develop an answer key. The simulation exercise has been a rewarding experience for the participants and we believe the answer key adds substantial insights to a methodical way to solve complex business problems similar to ABM’s.  The answer key progresses through a structured method to identify all the problems facing ABM and evolves an answer key with the following sections: Executive Summary – Includes cost-benefit analysis with $7M ROI of $1.8M spend, $5M in increased Revenues and $2M in Cost Reduction Situation Analysis – Demonstrating a structured method for identifying and focusing on the problem domain Innovation & Strategy Assessment – Demonstrating the health check of Strategy & Innovation with a roadmap People Assessment – Demonstrating the health check assessment for people & change management with a roadmap Enterprise Architecture Assessment – Demonstrating the health check assessment for EA with a roadmap ABM Turn-Around Roadmap – Demonstrating a comprehensive 2-year roadmap, 3 phases, 3 disciplines, and 2 work-streams: strategic and tactical SEAS thanks the authors, contributors, reviewers, and editor of this case study for their outstanding efforts. Those individuals have put in numerous hours pouring over the information, analyzing, questioning, and developing the answer key. Special thanks to Jeffrey Phillips, VP of Marketing at OVO, for writing the book’s foreword. Jeffrey shares his insights on Innovation and Change Management and the importance of managing change holistically. We hopes that you find the case study insightful and would love to hear from you. We encourage you to rate the book and write a review on the Apple Bookstore. You can also share your thoughts on our LinkedIn group. Happy...

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SEAS Inc. signs a collaboration MOU with OAGi
Mar20

SEAS Inc. signs a collaboration MOU with OAGi

The Strategy & Enterprise Architecture Society (SEAS) Inc. signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Open Applications Group Inc. to conduct joint Research & Development in the area of Business Integration.  Under this MOU the two organizations will do the following: Work to increase awareness of each other’s organizations and efforts for the purpose of increasing members’ involvement and knowledge.  Collaboration will include hosting webinars, participating in committees, and exchanging information OAGi and SEAS Inc. will share ideas, information, and collaborate on Case Studies to progress the objectives of both organizations. SEAS Inc. and OAGi will exchange non-voting memberships to their respective officers enabling the participating in committees and meetings “This MOU marks a key milestone for SEAS Inc. in it mission to help organizations achieve a competitive advantage.  The partnership with OAGi exemplifies Open Innovation and solidifies our efforts in making an impact in the Strategy & Innovation, Enterprise Architecture, and Change Management space.” Said Fadi Hindi, CEO of SEAS Inc. “This is a natural fit for us and we are pleased to be a partner with SEAS Inc.”, said David Connelly, CEO of OAGi.  “We are looking forward to working with a group of like-minded persons like SEAS and we look to expand OAGi’s reach as well and SEAS’s reach” We look forward to the output of this collaboration and increasing the knowledge of members in the area of Business...

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SEAS Inc. and OAGi in formal Collaboration Talks
Feb27

SEAS Inc. and OAGi in formal Collaboration Talks

SEAS has formally engaged with the Open Applications Group Inc. (http://www.oagi.org/) in collaboartion discussions for joint research in the areas of Integration and Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). The discussions center around 2 main areas: 1) Offering thought leadership and access to research of both organizations to members of SEAS and OAGi 2) Leveraging SEAS’ Case Study platform and method to conduct R&D for a real-world case study that articulates the business value of Integration and SOA. About OAGi: The Open Applications Group is a 501(c)(6) not-for-profit open standards development organization. Founded in 1994, The Open Applications Group Inc. (the OAGi) is organized to promote business process interoperability for both inter & intra enterprise business processes and to encourage the creation of and/or create and endorse one or more standards to assist organizations in achieving connectivity and multiple-source integration of inter & intra enterprise business processes.visit OAGi:...

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ABM Case Study Presented at ACMP MENA Conference
Feb13

ABM Case Study Presented at ACMP MENA Conference

The Association of Change Management Professionals (ACMP) MENA region hosted its forth annual conference in Dubai on February 4-6, 2014.  This year’s conference theme was “Manage Change: Achieve Success”.  It brought together Change Management experts and professionals to share experiences, network and learn from each other and from exports in the field. It was my privilege during the conference to present a paper on “Managing Organizational Change”.  The case study that we have been working through as the SEAS’ Consulting Team was showcased during my presentation.  During the session, participants also had the opportunity to complete an analysis of their own organization’s culture, which enriched the learning and created interesting discussions and debates that continued following the presentation. To download an excerpt of the presentation, click...

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eGovernment – Success or Failure
Jan28

eGovernment – Success or Failure

This paper – eGovernment – Success or Failure – describes why eGovernment projects succeed or fail and what can be done do to prevent failure. eGovernment projects tend to need substantial tax money funding. To have a dollar well spent, it is required that stakeholders create the right environment. eGovernment projects need to be reality-checked all through the design, implementation and operation. It is essential for the success of eGovernment projects that the design team build profound knowledge of the gaps between reality and desired outcome. These gaps are related to eight dimensions: information, technology, processes, objectives and values, staffing and skills, management systems and structures, other resources, and the outside world. It is necessary to take measures towards closing the gaps as early as possible. Most countries have engaged into eGovernment initiatives. Where some eGovernment implementations have been successful, others have failed in achieving their objectives, ranging between: Success: most stakeholder groups attained their major goals and did not experience significant undesirable outcomes. Partial failure: major goals were not attained or there were significant undesirable outcomes. Total failure: the initiative was never implemented or was implemented but immediately abandoned. There is little data available about the rates of success and failure of eGovernment, but according to some studies, 60 to 80% of eGovernment projects fail. To prevent an eGovernment project failure, we need to understand why they fail. Every project has gaps between the design and the current state. A key factor to success or failure is the level of difference between the current reality and the model/conception and assumptions built into the project’s design. The larger the gap, the greater the risk of failure. If the gap between design and reality can be reduced, the risk of eGovernment failure can be reduced. Three archetypes of eGovernment failure are identified that highlight the need for better communication between those who need to use and operate the system, and those who are brought in to design it: Hard-soft gaps – Most governmental organisations are dominated by ‘soft’ factors – people, politics, emotions and culture. eGovernment systems tend to get designed according to harder notions of machinery, rationality and objectivity thereby missing the soft factor of government services. Private-public gaps – Many IT systems have been designed in the private sector and shoehorned into a public sector reality which operates very differently. These differences are large and the likelihood of failure is high. Country context gaps – Infrastructure and mind-sets are very different across the world. A system designed for one country may not suitable for another country eGovernment Dimension Model or eGDM provides an understanding of the gaps that can exist...

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ABM Case Study – Change Management Approach
Dec19

ABM Case Study – Change Management Approach

During the Situation Analysis phase of the ABM Health Check Engagement Simulation, the Change Management team focused on developing a good understanding of the human capital and change related concerns.  Out of the 51 clarified concerns related to the ABM case study, 23 concerns were People related including retention, high employee dissatisfaction, poor communications, unstructured performance management processes and almost non-existent employee development and succession planning practices.  The 23 concerns were classified by seriousness, urgency, and growth and the top concerns were identified and prioritized. Due to the high number of concerns and the limited resources that ABM would have to address all the concerns at once, the Change Management team decided to take a more holistic approach to the analysis and step back to build an overall current state picture of the organization before diving into making any  recommendations or developing the roadmap.  The method that the Change Management team will be using for this holistic approach is the “Competing Values Framework” developed by Kim S. Cameron and Robert E. Quinn.  This framework focuses on “Culture” and provides a very good tool to help organizations analyze their current culture type and define the desired culture that will work for them to turn around their organization and achieve success. According to the Competing Values Framework, there are four major culture types: Hierarchy, Market, Clan, and Adhocracy.  The more an organization’s dominant culture matches with its leadership styles, management roles, human capital practices, and quality management strategies the more effective and successful the organization is.  The other finding of Cameron’s and Quinn’s research is that organizations tend to go through cultural changes as they grow and mature.  To the extent that an organization can define its desired future culture, this change can be more methodical and organized as opposed to what ABM is currently experiencing. In order to develop a roadmap and a set of recommendations for ABM, the Change Management team will start with a cultural analysis using the “Organizational Cultural Assessment Instrument” developed as part of the Competing Values Framework.  This assessment will be completed by ABM’s board of directors and will define each board member’s perspective on the current culture and desired culture for ABM.  Taking into consideration the agreed upon desired culture, the Change Management team will then work through the top concerns and develop a roadmap that addresses these concerns in a way that allows ABM to reach their desired culture.  The output of the cultural assessment can also be used by members of the SEAS’ Consulting Team in the Strategy & Innovation stream and the Enterprise Architecture...

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